Author Topic: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5 [UPDATED in August 2012]  (Read 53395 times)

Adam Twardoch (FontLab)

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This document contains font family recommendations revised as of August 2012. This version takes the highly problematic handling of fonts by Microsoft Word 2011 for Mac into account.

Creating font families that have family and style naming that works in all systems always was a difficult task. Below is a guide on how you should proceed devising font family and style naming using FontLab Studio 5. This guide uses some new terminology that we will be introducing in our future products.

Each font family should contain two family naming systems. There should be a typographic family (Typo Family) where there is one family name (Typo Family Name, short TFN) and multiple styles truly reflecting the typographic design of each style (each having a Typo Style Name, short TSN).

In addition, for families containing more than four styles, there should be several styling groups (each having a Styling Group Name, short SGN) with up to four styles each (each having a Styling Link Name, short SLN). Those styling groups set up styling links (“is bold of” and “is italic of”).

The Styling Link Names must be equal to one of the following four values: “Regular”, “Italic”, “Bold” or “Bold Italic”, and should always reflect the actual styling links set up by the “is italic” and “is bold” checkboxes.

Another important thing to remember: none of the names you need to devise yourself (TFN, TSN, SGN) should include any characters except uppercase and lowercase English letters, and spaces. This means, no digits, no ampersands, no dashes, no pluses, no slashes, no accented characters etc. Also, keep TFN, TSN and SGN less than 32 characters long.

Given that we have the following parameters to deal with:

ShortNameParameter NameFontLab Studio / Font Info / Names and CopyrightOpenType format fieldsLimitations
FFNFull Font NameFull Namename.4.1.0.0, name.4.3.1.1033, CFF.FullNamelength < 64 chars
PSNPostScript NamePS Font Namename.6.1.0.0, name.6.3.1.1033, CFF.FontNamelength < 30 chars, no spaces, only A-Za-z0-9 and one hyphen
TFNTypographic Family NameOpenType-specific names / OT Family Namename.16.3.1.1033, CFF.FamilyNamelength < 32 chars
TSNTypographic Style NameOpenType-specific names / OT Style Namename.17.3.1.1033length < 32 chars
SGNStyling Group NameFamily Namename.1.1.0.0, name.1.3.1.1033length < 32 chars
SLNStyling Link NameStyle Namename.2.1.0.0, name.2.3.1.1033length < 32 chars
Is BoldStyling Link “is bold”Font is boldhead.macStyle.bit0, OS/2.fsSelection.bit5
Is ItalicStyling Link “is italic”Font is italichead.macStyle.bit1, OS/2.fsSelection.bit0
WeightWeightWeight (numeric)CFF.Weight (OS/2.usWeightClass)value >= 250 and <= 900 in steps of 50, regular must be 400, bold must be 700

let’s consider an example naming scheme for the typographic family called “Demo”:

PSNTFNTSNSGNSLNIs BoldIs ItalicWeight
Demo-UltLigDemoUltra LightDemo UltLigRegularUltraLight (250)
Demo-UltLigItaDemoUltra Light ItalicDemo UltLigItalicXUltraLight (250)
Demo-LigDemoLightDemo LigRegularLight (300)
Demo-LigItaDemoLight ItalicDemo LigItalicXLight (300)
Demo-RegDemoRegularDemoRegularRegular (400)
Demo-ItaDemoItalicDemoItalicXRegular (400)
Demo-SemBolDemoSemiboldDemo SemBolRegularSemibold (600)
Demo-SemBolItaDemoSemibold ItalicDemo SemBolItalicXSemibold (600)
Demo-BolDemoBoldDemoBoldXBold (700)
Demo-BolItaDemoBold ItalicDemoBold ItalicXXBold (700)
Demo-BlaDemoBlackDemo BlaRegularBlack (900)
Demo-BlaItaDemoBlack ItalicDemo BlaItalicXBlack (900)
Demo-CondDemoCondensedDemo CondRegularRegular (400)
Demo-CondItaDemoCondensed ItalicDemo CondItalicXRegular (400)

In every typo family, there must be one default styling group. The default styling group is such that SGN = TFN. The default styling group may include up to four fonts (Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic), where the Regular and Italic styles should have weight 400, and the Bold and Bold Italic styles should have weight 700. The regular style of that styling group will serve as the default style for the entire typo family — in our case, it’s “Demo Regular” where TFN and SGN = “Demo” and SLN = “Regular”.

We recommend that all other styling groups only have two members each: Regular and Italic. In other words, except the default styling group, all other styling groups should only have members that have the same numeric weight, e.g. Light and Light Italic (300) or Black and Black Italic (900). In theory, it’s possible to construct styling groups where the Semibold (weight 600) is linked as bold for the Light (weight 300), but many applications do not work well with such styling groups (most notably Microsoft Word 2011 for Mac). In other words: use the “Font is bold” checkbox and the "Bold" or "Bold Italic" SLN only if the numerical weight of the font is 700.

When constructing the SGN for the remaining styling groups, use abbreviated versions of the TSN of the Regular font within that styling group as a suffix that you append (after a space) to the TFN to form the SGN. The reason for the abbreviation is that the standard font selector dialog used by many standard Windows applications (such as WordPad) is quite narrow so if your TFN is rather long, the final parts of the SGN could be cut off and not visible to the user, prohibiting him from distinguishing between the styling groups.

Some suffixes you could use are “Lt” or “Lig” for “Light”, “Bla” or “Blk” for “Black”, “XLt” or “XLig” for “Extra Light”, “ULt” or “UltLig” for “Ultra Light”, “Wd” for “Wide”, “Nar” for “Narrow”, “Ext” for “Extended”, “Exp” for “Expanded”, “Cn” or “Cond” for “Condensed”, “Cm” or “Comp” for “Compressed”. You can stack them one after another, separated by spaces, so one example SGN could be “Demo Cond XLig” or “Demo Cn XLt”. Remember that the length of the SGN, like all the other fields, should not exceed 32 characters.

Now, open all styles in FontLab Studio and open the Font Info dialog. In my further notes, I’ll put “OT” in front of field names that are on the “OpenType-specific...” pane.

When making PostScript Type 1 fonts:

  • Put the same TFN in the “Family Name” field for all fonts, e.g. “Demo”.
  • Append TSN to TFN, separating them by hyphen and stripping all spaces (e.g. “Demo-SemiboldItalic”), and put in the “Font Name” field. Remember, no spaces or special characters are permitted here, and there should be exactly one hyphen.
  • Copy the entry from the “Font Name” field to the “Full Name” field (this is recommended). Alternatively (this is less recommended), append TSN to TFN, separating them by space (e.g. “Demo Semibold Italic”) and put it in the “Full Name” field.
  • Copy the entry from the “Full Name” field to the “FOND Name” field (If there is a hyphen, replace it with a space).
  • Put SGN in the “Menu Name” field, e.g. “Demo Lt”.
  • Set “Font is italic” and “Font is bold” according to the style linking schema devised. (We recommend to set “Font is bold” only if the numerical weight is 700.)
  • For Windows Type 1 fonts, put SLN in the “Style Name” field (remember that it should correspond to the “is italic” and “is bold” checkboxes). For Mac Type 1 fonts, put TSN in the “Style Name” field.
  • Put the appropriate Weight to the “Weight” field.
  • If you’re creating a Windows Type 1 font, generate it. If you’re creating a Macintosh Type 1 font, build the suitcase according to the tips given in the Creating ATR-compatible suitcases document.

When making OpenType (PostScript- or TrueType-based) or TrueType fonts.
These are instructions revised in 2012 to take Microsoft Word 2011 into account.

  • Put TFN in the OT “Family Name” field (on the OpenType-specific names pane), e.g. “Demo”.
  • Put TSN in the OT “Style Name” field.
  • Append TSN to TFN, separating them by hyphen and stripping all spaces (e.g. “Demo-SemiboldItalic”), and put in the “Font Name” field. Remember, no spaces or special characters are permitted here, and there should be exactly one hyphen.
  • Append TSN to TFN, separating them by space (i.e. “Demo Semibold Italic”) and put it in the “Full Name” field.
  • Put SGN in the “Family Name” field.
  • Set “Font is italic” and “Font is bold” according to the style linking schema devised. (We recommend to set “Font is bold” only if the numerical weight is 700.)
  • Put SLN in the “Style Name” field (remember that it should correspond to the “is italic” and “is bold” checkboxes, and may only contain the text “Regular”, “Italic”, “Bold” or “Bold Italic”).
  • Put the appropriate Weight to the “Weight” field. Remember that the numerical weight should be no less than 250 and no greater than 900.
  • Also set the appropriate Width in the Width field.
  • Important for Word 2011 for Mac: In Preferences / Generating OpenType & TrueType, DISABLE “Use the OpenType names as menu names on Macintosh” (this is a new recommendation as of 2012, and different from what we previously recommended).
  • Important for Word 2011 for Mac: In Preferences / Generating OpenType & TrueType / OpenType PS (.otf), DISABLE “Use PostScript FontName as FullName on Windows” (this is a new recommendation as of 2012, and different from what we previously recommended)

Important for Word 2011 for Mac: The following additional recommendations are also new and address problems with Microsoft Word 2011 for Mac:

  • After completing the steps described above, go to Font Info / Names and Copyright / Additional OpenType Names.
  • Click on the “Import Names” button (the first button on the top of the pane).
  • In the list of name table entries, find the entry NID=16, PID=1, EID=0, LID=0 (i.e. the Mac Preferred Family name) and remove it using the “—” button.
  • In the list of name table entries, find the entry NID=17, PID=1, EID=0, LID=0 (i.e. the Mac Preferred Subfamily name) and remove it using the “—” button.
  • In Preferences / Creating OpenType & TrueType, in the drop-down list choose “Export only OpenType name records - ignore default names”.

Now you can generate your fonts as OpenType PS (.otf) or Win TrueType/OpenType TT (.ttf).

Finally: for OpenType and TrueType fonts, we recommend that you also use the “Font Name” as basis for your filename. So the OpenType version of Demo-SemiboldItalic should be generated as Demo-SemiboldItalic.otf — it is advisable to avoid spaces and special characters in filenames. For Windows Type 1 fonts, it is best if you make a filename that is no more than 8 characters long, especially if you want backwards compatibility with old Windows versions. So the font could be named MYGASBDI.PFB, for example. Alternatively, you can just use the “Font Name” as well (so Demo-SemiboldItalic.pfb). For Mac Type 1 suitcases, use the default filename suggested by FontLab Studio.

To sum it up, here’s a small checklist of the requirements for OpenType (.ttf or .otf) fonts that you need to follow:

  • The “Width” field should represent the true typographic width of the font. Choose the value provided in the dropdown list that best matches the design of the font, but make sure that all fonts with the same Family Name have the same value.
  • The “Weight” field should represent the true typographic weight the font. Choose the value provided in the dropdown list that best matches the design of the font, but do not use the “UltraLight”, “Thin” or “ExtraLight” values. Make sure that the numeric weight value is no less than 250 and not greater than 900. Preferably use numerical weights in steps of 100 or 50.
  • We recommend that one upright and (if there is one) one italic member of your family have the numerical weight 400.
  • No more than four fonts in the family may be in the same styling group, i.e. have the same value in the “Family Name” field.
  • Each font in the styling group, i.e. with the same “Family Name” value must have a different combination of “Font is bold” and “Font is italic” checkboxes.
  • We recommend that the “Bold” SLN (“Font is bold” checkbox) is only used if the font has the numerical weight 700 and the “Regular” SLN of the same styling group has the numerical weight 400.
  • We recommend that the “Bold Italic” SLN (“Font is bold” and “Font is italic” checkboxes) is only used if the font has the numerical weight 700 and the “Italic” SLN of the same styling group has the numerical weight 400.
  • If the font has the numerical weight different than 700, make it the “Regular” or “Italic” SLN of a separate styling group — do not style-link it as bold with other fonts. In other words, you may use the “is italic” styling link for italic fonts with numerical weight different than 700 but not the “is bold” styling link.
  • The “Style Name” field must have one of the four values: “Regular”, “Italic”, “Bold”, “Bold Italic”. No other values are acceptable. Make sure that the values you enter there correspond to the combination of “Font is bold” and “Font is italic” checkboxes, for example, if both checkboxes are enabled, the “Style Name” field must have the value “Bold Italic”.

We’re working hard on making all this much easier in the new versions of our products.

Regards,
Adam Twardoch
Fontlab Ltd.

CHANGELOG:
* 2012-08-19:
Added recommendation not to style-link across weights different than 400 and 700 (i.e. only style-link uprights with italics unless the weights really are 400 and 700).
Now recommending to disable the previously enabled Option “Use the OpenType names as menu names on Macintosh”.
Now recommending to disable the previously enabled Option “Use PostScript FontName as FullName on Windows”.
Added recommendation to manually remove name IDs 16.1.0.0 and 17.1.0.0 (Mac Preferred names).

The short rationale of changes is: modern Mac OS X systems and Adobe applications on the Mac use the "Windows preferred" (16.3.1.1033 and 17.3.1.1033). The Mac preferred names are not used except in Word 2011, which uses them badly: in the Format / Font dialog box, Word 2011 uses the normal Windows names (1.3.1.1033 and 2.3.1.1033) but in the Font menu, Word 2011 uses a strange mixture of normal Mac names (1.1.0.0 and 2.1.0.0) and of preferred Mac names (16.1.0.0 and 17.1.0.0). If normal Mac names don't match the normal Windows names, then styles disappear randomly. If the preferred Mac style name (17.1.0.0) is different from the normal Mac style name (2.1.0.0), then the same font is listed twice under different names. If normal Mac names match the normal Windows names, and there are no preferred Mac names, then Word 2011 lists the fonts the same way as Word 2010 on Windows would do (i.e. using styling groups with up to 4 styles) but at least this works consistently. Most or all other Mac and Adobe apps will still use the Windows preferred names, so the typographic grouping will still work there.
« Last Edit: 2013-04-18, 10:52:05 by Adam Twardoch (FontLab) »
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Adam Twardoch
Fontlab Ltd.

Adam Twardoch (FontLab)

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #1 on: 2009-03-04, 16:55:10 »
Below are two screenshots showing the relevant Font Info section after the correct naming for an OpenType font has been entered.
« Last Edit: 2009-03-04, 16:57:15 by Adam Twardoch (FontLab) »
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Adam Twardoch
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Vladimir Tamari

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #2 on: 2009-03-06, 02:15:05 »
Thanks Adam, As a newbie I found the whole question of font-naming baffling. I will study your post carefully when naming my new font family which consists of six weights.  One problem that I find needs a solution (whether in Fontlab or under-the-hood within OT itself) is a way to prevent programs such as MS Word from creating their own fake bolds when the B button is pressed.  Perhaps you know of a way this could be made to work in Fontlab:

Let us say the font family consists of six weights ranging from extra-light (call it A) to light (B) to Regular (C) and so on till (F) extra bold.   Now supposing a user in Word is typing using (A) and wants to make a phrase appear bold; it would be nice if font (B) appears when the Bold button is clicked, rather than Word's own 'fake-bold' version of (A), with its shapeless bloated outline . In other words (B) would be the designated bold for (A). And when using weight (B) it will be nice if weight (C) is or (D) is switched on automatically (not necessarily the next-darker). and so on.

I experimented with setting  all the fonts as Bold so that Word cannot create its own fake bolds, forcing the user to select the weights manually, and that worked. We had discussions of this on Typophile but I do not think a satisfactory conclusion was ever reached http://typophile.com/node/44050 
Best wishes
Vladimir

Adam Twardoch (FontLab)

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #3 on: 2009-03-06, 03:30:00 »
Vladimir,

your case is just like the one I illustrated in my example, with four weights: Light, Regular, Semibold, Bold. The Semibold is the styling bold link of the Light and the Bold is the styling bold link of the Regular. So for six weights, you need three styling groups, each with a separate SGN, and each having one "Regular" and one "Bold" SLN.

There is one important restriction, though: in Font Info, do not use the Weight entries "Ultra Light" or "Thin", and if you pick "Extra Light", replace the number 200 next to it with the number 250.

So in your case, the family naming might be following:

#    TFN    TSN    SGN    SLN    Is Bold    Is Italic    Weight   
1.Vladimir Sans    ExtraLight   Vladimir Sans XLt    Regular            Extra Light (250)   
2.Vladimir Sans    Light    Vladimir Sans XLt    Bold    X        Light (300)   
3.Vladimir Sans    Regular    Vladimir Sans   Regular            Regular (400)   
4.Vladimir Sans    Semibold    Vladimir Sans SBd    Regular            Semibold (600)   
5.Vladimir Sans    Bold    Vladimir Sans    Bold    X        Bold (700)   
6.Vladimir Sans    Black    Vladimir Sans SBd   Bold    X        Bold (900)   

But note that this will mean that the Light, Bold and Black styles will not be available separately in the menu in typical Windows applications, so the only way to access them in, say, Word, would be to select the corresponding style-linked regular link, and then use the "B" button on the toolbar.
Regards,
Adam Twardoch
Fontlab Ltd.

Vladimir Tamari

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #4 on: 2009-03-10, 21:06:06 »
Adam,  over the years I saw your painstaking and detailed answers to questions people asked in Typophile and MSN Fontlab Forums. Now I am the beneficiary of your expertise thank you so much!  Your scheme 'hides' three of the weights in Windows applications but prevents the fake-bolds. How about an older idea- giving the fonts separate names ie AlQuds50 AlQuds100 AlQuds150..AlQuds300  and marking them all as 'bold' to prevent fake-bolds? This seemed to work on my PC but are there must be drawbacks, apart from the over-crowded menu list?

Adam Twardoch (FontLab)

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #5 on: 2009-03-13, 16:46:14 »
Vladimir,

doing something just to "prevent fake bolds" is not really much of an interesting motivation. Most users want to actually see a bold font when they format text as bold. Remember that especially with Latin text, the italic and bold formatting is often used, and gets carried over in HTML, RTF or Word documents. So preventing fake bold is good but having truly functional bold is even better (same applies for italic, of course).

The styling group menu naming gets exposed primarily in office applications on Windows. The experience shows that users of those applications prefer to have a functional bold or italic formatting option over the direct comfortable access to all weights. On the other hand, users who want direct access to all weights typically use publishing applications, or they use Mac OS X, where the style linking works fine but the menus is not constrained to the styling group naming (and instead, exposes the full typographic naming).

But of course, the scheme I presented is just one compromise that many font vendors and users seem to agree on. Depending on your particular needs, you are free to modify it.

However, as far as I understand, you seem to suggest to mark _all_ styles as bold (and each having a separate styling group name). I definitely think it is NOT a good idea. This will certainly get you into trouble in some applications when users are trying out various fonts for their text. For example, if the user selects all his text (which may have regular and bold formatting mixed), and switches to a font family made the way you suggested, and then decides against it and switches to yet another family, he may find that all of his text has been reformatted to bold (I believe this is actually what might happen in InDesign). I'd definitely recommend against making families where you have styling groups that have an italic or a bold member but no corresponding regular.

Also, if you are planning to make any Mac Type 1 fonts, remember not to use digits in family names or style names.

Regards,
Adam
« Last Edit: 2009-03-13, 16:50:58 by Adam Twardoch (FontLab) »
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Adam Twardoch
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Vladimir Tamari

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #6 on: 2009-03-17, 07:09:18 »
Thanks Adam,
Since this is my first (and so far only) font family I guess I was rather happy to see all six weights listed in the Windows App. menu :)

Of course you are right a user of say, Word, would rather click the B button and see a nice bold appear instead of changing the font itself from the menu.  And as you say those who care about subtleties of weights know how to access them in Adobe graphical programs  or in Mac software. 

This discussion made me think of an idea:  Fontlab has Actions to affect controlled changes like embolding* a font. Perhaps in future editions there will be a slider to input the required change percentage, and more importantly a live view of the changes in the glyph window.  Who knows maybe such a slider will find its way to regular Office or Adobe software, replacing the B button!
Cheers!
* I thought to coin this usage meaning 'to make letters bold' but see this discussion:
(I thought to coin this word, but see http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/28977-embold.html )

Arno Enslin

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #7 on: 2009-04-03, 12:42:03 »
There is a slight mistake in your naming tutorial, Adam:

Quote
Remember that the length of the SGN, like all the other fields, should not exceed 32 characters.

31 characters, but not 32.

__________________________________

With regard to the next versions of FontLab, I would like to see, if the developers would create a panel more close to the specifications. Why not take the same terms as in the specifications? DTL OTMaster and Highlogic FontCreator both provide those solutions. That’s less irritating than fantasy terms like typographic family. The four member sub family (Regular, Italic, Bold and Bold Italic) also is a typographic family. If you take the terms, that are written in the specs, you avoid doubts about the meaning.

I don’t name fonts with FontLab because of all the bugs, but I decompile the name table and the CFF table with TTX, edit it in a text editor and than I merge it into the source font.

It would be nice, if the next version of FontLab would provide two name panels. One for TTF and OTF and one for Type1 fonts. And names, that will not be stored in TTF (the names from the CFF-table) should be marked. And the names, that are required according to the specifications also should be marked. When I am naming a font in the next version of FontLab, I would like to know, which name will be put into which namerecord(s). My proposal is, not to write tutorials for font naming, but to create a naming panel, that is the tutorial. The screen is big enough for that. And generally – it would be nice, if the panel had fields for personal comments of the users, that are stored in a user file.

Mmh, I think, that Adobe limits the number of the characters of the PostScript name according to the old technical notes, that are regarding to Type1 fonts. All this mess is unbelievable. I meanwhile have read dozens of different values for the maximum string length. The TRUE maximum length also should be stored on the naming panel. Or two values for each name. The one, that is recommended (because of limitations of old tools, printers and so on), and the one, that matches with the specifications.

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #8 on: 2009-06-03, 07:51:58 »
Hi Adam,
my latest display font (Tertre) does not lend itself easily to the 'family' concept: Thin, Light, Medium, Bold, Heavy, possibly Black (no italics). Calling Medium 'bold' in the 'Thin' family does not sound right. Already, with Thin, Light and Bold it does not work in MS Word (Mac). What am I to do?

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #9 on: 2009-06-07, 01:06:54 »
What am I to do?
Please upload (in a file) a table with the names, weight values and the status of the checkboxes of all styles.

Quote
Calling Medium 'bold' in the 'Thin' family does not sound right.
If you mean the SLN, it is right. That doesn’t cause the problem.
« Last Edit: 2009-06-07, 01:09:02 by Arno Enslin »

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #10 on: 2009-06-07, 08:11:43 »
Arno, thanks for your answer. My worry is that I do not know which fonts people will purchase. The scheme above where Light is the bold style of Extra Light, and as such never shows in the menu is not acceptable. No one might wish to use my Light as bold for the Extra Light. They might want to buy the Light and use the Bold with it. I would rather make them all individual fonts and abandon any pretense of families: the problem is that under the same family name no more than two seem to load into MS applications.

Arno Enslin

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #11 on: 2009-06-07, 09:33:55 »
paragraph

There is no duty to build sub families with four members. A sub family (the family name in the font info panel – in case of OpenType, not in case of Type 1) can contain 1–4 members. If you have many weights, the best way is, to build sub families, that contain two members only. Each sub family contains the upright style of a weight and the italic style of the same weight. If the user wants to change the weight, he has to use the drop down list of the font menu. Then you should use Regular and Italic as SLN only.

This should work, if you prefer, not to style link:

TFN     TSN     SGN     SLN     Is Bold     Is Italic     Weight     
Tertre     Thin     Tertre Thin     Regular               Thin     
Tertre     Light     Tertre Light     Regular               Light     
Tertre     Medium     Tertre Medium     Regular               Medium     
Tertre     Bold     Tertre Bold     Regular               Bold     
Tertre     Heavy     Tertre Heavy     Regular               Heavy     
Tertre     Black     Tertre Black     Regular               Black     
« Last Edit: 2009-06-07, 14:56:19 by Arno Enslin »

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #12 on: 2009-06-07, 18:15:22 »
Thanks, Arno. That looks like the only way out, one family each. Do you by any chance know why Adam recommends not using Thin and changing the value to 250 above?

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #13 on: 2009-06-07, 18:43:31 »
Do you by any chance know why Adam recommends not using Thin and changing the value to 250 above?

Karsten Lucke notes in his naming guide that some applications handle weights below 250 by fattening them. I’m not sure why that’s a font problem and not a software problem…

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Re: Font Family Naming in FontLab Studio 5
« Reply #14 on: 2009-06-07, 19:15:54 »
Thanks, James. Good luck with Downturn!